Fleet Foxes at Sentrum Scene

The well crafted indie folk music immediately transported its audience to a bonfire in the mountains of Washington State

Photo: Sadan Ekdemir

Fleet Foxes presented their first of two sold out concerts at Sentrum Scene on Tuesday 5th of December. The venue was completely packed, and the band came out quarter past nine to allure their audience with a charming concert. Once again they proved the kings of vocal harmonies. If you don’t believe me, and old but definite proof can be seen in their Take Away Show in the video below.

Impeccable harmonies

Initially I had thought I was going to miss the presence of their former collaborator Father John Misty, but this was not the case.

Frontman Robin Pecknold, along with  Skyler Skjelset, Casey Westcott, Christian Wargo, and Morgan Henderson, appeared on a dimly lit stage, with red, blue and yellow pastel colors and figures illuminating the screen behind them. Intense red spots would be placed directly over Pecknold during his solos, whilst the rest of the venue would remain in total darkness.  Impeccable harmonies supported the lead singer, accompanied chiefly by keyboards, electro-acoustic guitars, mandolins, double bass and drums.

Initially I had thought I was going to miss the presence of their former collaborator Father John Misty, but this was not the case.  The well crafted indie folk music immediately transported me to a bonfire in the mountains of Washington State or the Blue Ridge Mountains.

The band kicked off the concert with All That I Need / Arroyo Seco / Thumbprint Scar followed by Cassius both from their latest album, “Crack-Up”. Fleet Foxes often construct their songs with different structures and pieces, almost like songs within a song. The concert was structured in the same vain, sliding the end of one song onto a new one, without breaks. Except for a few times, where Pecknold takes advantage of the small venue to interact with the audience. The interaction is friendly and relaxed – with the frontman bantering about his Norwegian ancestry and buzzfeed-style questions – making the feel of the concert even more intimate and special.

Like pearls on a string

Every song on the setlist was a reason for joy

The filter on vocals made the band members sound sharp and clear, yet paradoxically at the same time cozy and distant. The volume was not as high as has become common at many live concerts. In fact, it actually felt like any sound coming from the public would disrupt the comforting sounds coming from the stage. A brilliant move it turns out, as the audience showed great respect for the decision. Providing the band all the silence necessary to allow the person next to them to enjoy the delicate sounds from the flute, horns, and sax, all originating from the talented Morgan Henderson.

With three steady LPs in their career, every song on the setlist was a reason for joy. Classics such as White Winter Hymnal, All Ragged Wood, and Your Protector, followed one another one like pearls on a string, just like in their “Fleet Foxes” album. At moments, the band clearly demonstrated that their instrumental talents go beyond your typical Seattle Alt-Folk band. This exercise in musicianship came through complicated musical structures, crescendos and overall instrumental delights with sounds pleasantly and playfully complementing each other.

Of course, to me it’s mostly about the harmonies in their voices. Nonetheless, some of the peak moments of the concert came during Pecknold’s solos Tiger Mountain Peasant Song and Oliver James. Fleet Foxes left me with a feeling I just saw a band that, although more experienced, was refreshed and ready for more.

Fleet Foxes @ Sentrum Scene: 9/10

 


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